Dry January – Why this is a thing for me

 

“Work is the curse of the drinking classes.” – Oscar Wilde

To celebrate the start of the new year (alongside all the musings about the past, and signing up to crazy sporting events), I’m going to not drink alcohol for a month.

This is partly because it’s Dry January (heeey…is that a BANDWAGON I can jump on?) and mostly because I celebrated a bit too much over the Christmas period and now I feel like my liver has it’s own heartbeat.

Last year I gave up drinking for a bit. I blogged about it at 10 days, and the whole experiment lasted all of 14 days. Turns out I like drinking more than I thought I did.

The trouble is, I don’t think drinking likes me that much anymore.

Alcohol Concern in the UK will tell you that “alcohol is the UK’s biggest risk factor for death, ill-health and disability for people aged 15-49”, and that taking part in Dry January will help one to “sleep better, lose weight, and save money”. This is great news for me as mostly staying in hostels over Christmas with roomful of snorers has rendered me sleep deprived. I also picked up 2kgs in weight due to stuffing my fat face with snacks and booze. Plus I’m also broke as it turns out lots of fun things over Christmas cost money.

In addition to the above I can add two words which serve as another key motivator: heart burn. 

Hangovers have been steadily getting worse over the past 5 or 6 years (a sign of getting old), but the heart burn is a new side effect of the aging process which came on around 8 months following a night out with friends. A burning throat and feeling like you are being stabbed in the sternum is a new horror to add to the unpleasantness of a hangover I can tell you.

This happened a number of times, until a trip to the doctors told me that it’s simply acid reflux, which was caused by gastritis, which was caused by too much booze and black coffee. I could live the rest of my life on Omeprazole, eat Gaviscon like it’s popcorn, or I could take on some lifestyle choices.

So these are my motivators for quitting the booze for the month, and a personal experiment to see if I can do it, and what chances will occur (if any).

If I suddenly become a thin, rested, reflux-free, rich chick I might keep it up forever…

5 thoughts on “Dry January – Why this is a thing for me”

  1. I can’t “like” articles in WordPress for some reason, but I tried. I’m surprised that you drank a lot of alcohol. Nonetheless, this article was funny; but I feel wrong in laughing. After all, I did have a friend die of alcoholism (etc.) the summer before last. I think you’ll get it under control and keep it that way though; of course it’s best to quit completely. It’s not called intoxication for no reason, it really is toxic. But it makes us feel good for a spell, or at least makes us all uninhibited. Blah, I can do without that false pleasure. I’ve never taken to alcohol, find it really nasty tasting, like bug spray or something equally repellant. Think of it that way…bug spray! I wish you the best in your being alcohol free and healthier.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s weird but drinking really is something that is so ingrained in British society – and even I notice in NZ now I’m here – that it’s just something you do. It’s how you socialise.

      There was a time when drinking was fun and social for me, but as I get older the fun element has dissipated somewhat, and while it’s social at the time I’m pretty antisocial the next day as I battle hangovers and heartburn. Over Christmas I literally drank every day for 2 weeks – and to excess about 4 or 5 times. That’s pretty bad. I always think of drinking with friends as ‘fun’, but actually the fun things that I did in those two weeks didn’t involve drinking and were more about getting outdoors in nature (beaches, hiking etc).

      So, January seems as good as time as any to get off the booze-train, and to rethink what I catagorise as ‘fun’ in my life.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m sorry to hear about your friend dying of alcoholism. It’s such a sad and horrible illness. Both of my parents were alcoholics (one still is), so I know what it’s like to see someone go through it. Another motivator to quit completely…

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I hope you’re blessed with the strength to do what you need for your good health. I know how hard it is, having known that severe alcoholic who died, as well as my having had an overeating addiction (food as drug) for most of my life; always such an insatiable hunger and a huge battle with being really obese. I’m finally comfortable with my weight and have been for about 7 years…going strictly vegan was the key. Seeing my late brother be destroyed by the food addiction…by diabetes…has helped me even further to never let that destructive hunger control me again.
        Btw, I found something in my late brother’s belongings that tastes like champagne to me, but it’s good for you: https://www.amazinggrass.com/store/effervescent-berry.html ..Put it in a champagne glass and enjoy?

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thanks Laura I’ll check out that Amazing Grass. I’ve been doing a lot of reading recently on addiction in general, and being the adult child of alcoholics – I might share some of my thoughts on this on the blog at at later date, but it involves a bit of self examination which I think may be a bit painful. I know I am not addicted to alcohol, but I do have unhealthy drinking patterns…it’s weird as I am so careful around other aspects of my life such as vegan diet and regular exercise though – I guess everyone has their vices. I’m sorry about your brother – I know it’s hard to watch someone with an addiction harming themselves. *hugs*

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s